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Game of Thrones and Wolf Hall: Surprisingly Similar

 
  Wednesday, April 29, 2015  
 
  Game of Thrones and Wolf Hall? Not obvious bedfellows you might think: the former supposedly crass and vulgar, with sex and mutilation to the fore, the latter, its fans would argue, the most subtle and sophisticated, even esoteric, of recent British literary adaptations ... (Read more of this article from The Telegraph)

Source: The Telegraph
 
 
 
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Queens Boulevard: Paths to power on Wolf Hall and The Casual Vacancy

 
  Wednesday, April 29, 2015  
 
  Once upon a time, before “The Sopranos” broke the monopoly, PBS was America’s primary source for prestige television. With little competition, the network perfected that brand, as exemplified by “Masterpiece Theatre,” an oracular phrase used without irony and with a kind of innocence. The network’s costume dramas might let you commune with genius, the logo hinted: they’d improve and elevate you, like a lecture at the 92nd Street Y. But, as TV drama grew out of its insecurities, the PBS lineup, despite small charmers, like “Call the Midwife,” began to seem stuffy, snoozy, and rather silly, an artifact of a time when the medium had to put on airs. “Wolf Hall,” the BBC adaptation of two Booker Prize-winning novels by Hilary Mantel, looked ominously like the same old, same old: a costume drama set in sixteenth-century England, scored to classical music, starring actors with faces like romantic ruins—yet another relic wheeled out of the vault ... (Read more of this article from The New Yorker)  

Source: The New Yorker
 
 
 
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Wolf Hall Recap: Cromwell the Serpent Makes an Appearance

 
  Tuesday, April 28, 2015  
 
  The more effectively historical fiction does its job, the more it blurs the lines between the known and the imagined. Watch Peter Shaffer’s “Amadeus,” and you’ll come away thinking Salieri spent his life sticking pins into Mozart. Watch Arthur Miller’s “The Crucible,” and you’ll think the Salem witch trials could have been averted if John Proctor had received more lovin’ at home. Watch “Wolf Hall,” and you’ll think Thomas More (Anton Lesser) could have sidestepped the executioner’s blade if only as a teenager he had returned a lad’s wave ... (Read more of this New York Times review)  

Source: The New York Times
 
 
 
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Shakespeare’s Plays In Three Panel Comics

 
  Monday, April 27, 2015  
 
  Here is a treasure trove of Shakespeare-themed cartoons and affectionate, backhanded tributes to the Bard and his works ... (Read more  
 
 
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Did Christopher Marlowe Fake His Death?

 
  Monday, April 27, 2015  
 
  Just weeks after playwright Christopher Marlowe was murdered at age 29, high-quality literary works started being published under the name "William Shakespeare." Whether they are the same person or not, Ros Barber makes the case for Marlowe having faked his own death ... (Read more  
 
 
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William Shakespeare, Gangster

 
  Monday, April 27, 2015  
 
  He hung out with prostitutes, thugs, and extortionists, and he was taken to court for making death threats. Oddly enough, we are speaking of William Shakespeare ... (Read more)  
 
 
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The Poet’s Hand

 
  Monday, April 27, 2015  
 
  Two New York City book dealers are in possession of a hand-annotated reference book that may have belonged to Shakespeare. Whatever the truth may be, the literary evidence for their claim is compelling ...  (Read more)  
 
 
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BBC Reigns Globally With ‘Wolf Hall’ Adaptation

 
  Sunday, April 26, 2015  
 
   A Booker Prize-winning pair of novels about the middle-aged manager of Henry VIII’s court doesn’t sound like the next hit literary property for the stage and screen, but Wolf Hall has so far turned conventional wisdom on its head ... (Read more of this Variety article)

Source: Variety
 
 
 
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Thirteen Everyday Phrases That Actually Came From Shakespeare

 
  Sunday, April 26, 2015  
 
  From "heart of gold" to "It's all Greek to me," many figures of speech that we take for granted were first uttered by the Bard. Here are 13 examples, alongside their sources in the plays, and our contemporary usage of the phrases ... (Read more)    
 
 
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Ten Things You Didn't Know About Shakespeare

 
  Sunday, April 26, 2015  
 
 
Far from being a starving artist living in a garret, William Shakespeare was a wealthy landowner who wrote to impress his contemporaries, and he truly didn't care what posterity thought about his plays. Here are ten fascinating facts about English literature's most enigmatic author, some of which are quite surprising ... (Read more)
 
 
 
 
 
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Elizabethan Playhouses, Actors, and Audiences

 
  Sunday, April 26, 2015  
 
  This intriguing article creates the rowdy yet entertaining atmosphere of the Elizabethan stage, and explains the day-to-day procedures of producing a play and running a theatre ... (Read more)    
 
 
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Shakespeare and the Lord Chamberlain’s Men

 
  Saturday, April 25, 2015  
 
 
Within Shakespeare's lifetime, actors and playwrights made the transition from being disreputable minstrels to being honored artists under the patronage of the king. Read about the birth of modern theatre here ... (Read more)
 
 
 
 
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The Gruesome Ways Every Character in Wolf Hall Died in Real Life

 
  Saturday, April 25, 2015  
 
 
Wolf Hall has so many characters, it's nearly impossible to follow all the action without a few trips to Wikipedia, and once there, it's impossible not to be spoiled. The miniseries ends with the biggest execution of 1536, but even the characters who made it out of that year with their heads firmly attached to their necks ended up imprisoned in the Tower of London one way or another. No, the Tudor era was not a safe one for its courtiers — you either died a traitor under King Henry VIII, or you lived long enough to see yourself burned as a heretic under Queen Mary.
 
Who ended up with a one-way ticket to Tower Hill, and who managed to beat the odds and die peacefully in old age? Let's find out! ... (Read more of this Vulture article)  

Source: Vulture
 
 
 
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Shakespeare's Globe Theatre

 
  Friday, April 24, 2015  
 
 
The Parliament's 1642–44 closure of England's theatres destroyed a vital link to our understanding of Elizabethan drama. Upon consulting archival accounts, however, it is easy to deduce that the Globe must have been an entertaining place to spend the day ... (Read more)
 
 
 
 
 
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The Mystery of Shakespeare's Identity

 
  Friday, April 24, 2015  
 
  Never mind the Warren Commission and the "lone gunman theory"—there's a skeptical Shakespeare Authorship Coalition who really, really want to know who wrote Hamlet, King Lear, and the sonnets ... (Read more)    
 
 
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Is Shakespeare to Blame for Our Skin Worries?

 
  Friday, April 24, 2015  
 
  He enriched our language, penned dozens of classics, and elevated drama to high art, but could Shakespeare be the villain who created the stigma of skin disease? ... (Read more)    
 
 
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Has the Mystery of Shakespeare’s Sonnets Finally Been Solved?

 
  Friday, April 24, 2015  
 
  Four hundred years after William Shakespeare dedicated his sonnets to "Mr WH," a researcher believes he has uncovered the identity of the mystery man—a discovery that poses more questions than it answers ... (Read more)    
 
 
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Me, Me, Me.… The Elizabethan Earl Who Kept Portrait Painters Busy for 30 Years

 
  Monday, April 20, 2015  
 
 
In the Elizabethan age, millions lived and died in complete anonymity—but not Robert Dudley. The queen's favorite courtier had 20 portraits of himself made. Dudley' story—and not surprisingly, some images of this dandy—appear here ... (Read more)
 
 
 
 
 
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Renaissance Fashion: Women's Clothing in Elizabethan England

 
  Sunday, April 19, 2015  
 
  If the ruffs and billowing sleeves of Elizabethan clothing seem a bit overwrought, they were not without reason. This article provides a thorough grounding in the styles, materials, and purposes of the era's garments ... (Read more)    
 
 
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The Spanish Armada

 
  Sunday, April 19, 2015  
 
 
England's 1588 rout of the Spanish Armada was one of the greatest triumphs in the nation's history. It was also Queen Elizabeth's finest hour, despite the loss of her dearest friend ... (Read more)
 
 
 
 
 
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Research suggests Shakespeare wrote lost play

 
  Sunday, April 19, 2015  
 
  "For centuries, these plays and three dozen more by William Shakespeare have formed history's most heralded literary canon. But now they may have to make room for an addition to Shakespeare's famous oeuvre" ... (Read more of this CNN story)

Source: CNN  
 
 
 
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Wolf Hall Recap: Thomas More Follows His Principles Straight to the Torture Chamber

 
  Sunday, April 19, 2015  
 
   More, More, More … how do you like him?
 
Do you prefer the pained idealist of Robert Bolt’s “A Man for All Seasons,” marching toward martyrdom with melancholy eyes and perfect diction? Or the creepy, stringy-haired guy who intones Latin while, a few feet away, one of his heretic-prisoners writhes in a nasty device called Skeffington’s Daughter?
 
That scene of torture — the opening tableau of Episode 3 — gives us the clearest possible sense of where Hilary Mantel stands in the ongoing debate over Thomas More’s character ... (Read more of this review from the NY Times)

Source: The New York Times
 
 
 
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Is this Walter Raleigh’s 'Lost Colony' Drawn in Invisible Ink?

 
  Saturday, April 18, 2015  
 
  The disappearance of Sir Walter Raleigh's Roanoke colony has been puzzling historians for more than four centuries. The answer may have been there all along, written in invisible ink ... (Read more)    
 
 
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The Outrageous Flirting, Jealous Rages, and Nightly Visits to a Courtier's Bedroom of Elizabeth I

 
  Saturday, April 18, 2015  
 
 
Was she a self-denying virgin or a promiscuous flirt? Elizabeth I was a mystery to her contemporaries, and she remains so today. A miscellany of opinions on the queen's so-called love life can be found here ... (Read more)
 
 
 
 
 
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England's Dark Intrigue

 
  Saturday, April 18, 2015  
 
 
It is a suspenseful tale of religious zealots in the nation's capital, plotting to detonate explosives in hopes of killing as many representatives of the government as possible. Is it from the news? Is it from a John le Carré novel? No, we speak of Guy Fawkes Day. Read about this complex and dramatic saga here ... (Read more)
 
 
 
 
 
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Eyewitness Account of the Execution of Mary Queen of Scots

 
  Saturday, April 18, 2015  
 
  This gripping, moment-by-moment account of Mary, Queen of Scots's final moments shows the remarkable dignity of Elizabeth's foremost rival ... (Read more)    
 
 
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The Great Queen: Parts 1 and 2

 
  Friday, April 17, 2015  
 
  During the reign of Elizabeth I, life improved dramatically for many Britons. Under Elizabeth II, life is even better—at least for now. Here is a fascinating comparison of the two monarchs and their eras ... (Read more)    
 
 
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Wolf Hall Recap: Cromwell Shows Us His Two Sides

 
  Wednesday, April 15, 2015  
 
 
Leo McKern, is that you?
 
I ask because, until Hilary Mantel published her Tudor books, the best-known pop-culture representation of Thomas Cromwell was McKern’s floridly villainous turn in the film “A Man for All Seasons” (1966) — a performance worth reviewing only because it shows us Cromwell as we used to “know” him: snarling, humorless, mendacious, intent on bullying a saintly man into martyrdom ... (Read more of this New York Times Review)

Source: The New York Times
 
 
 
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Royal Shakespeare Company’s Six-Hour Wolf Hall Brings Binge Viewing To Broadway: Review

 
  Tuesday, April 14, 2015  
 
   Here’s the thing: If you want to savor an adaptation of Hilary Mantel’s historical novels about boy-crazy King Henry VIII, you can go the leisurely route via public television, or you can binge, Netflix -style, on, of all places, Broadway. One is free and spread across weekly installments. The other is, well, not free, but can be enjoyed over a full-immerge in a single day, or separately on two occasions at the Winter Garden Theatre. Of course, you can also read the story, comprising two books, Wolf Hall and Bring Up The Bodies. Who would have imagined the 16th Century could produce stories to rival any reality TV series? ... (Read more of this Deadline article)

Source: Deadline
 
 
 
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Elizabeth and Her Men

 
  Monday, April 13, 2015  
 
  No one has ever doubted the political acumen and shrewd intelligence of Elizabeth I, but the Virgin Queen also relied heavily upon her feminine wiles to control the men in her court. Philippa Gregory recounts how Elizabeth made the most of being the nation's only unmarried queen ... (Read more)    
 
 
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The Death of Edward VI Leads to Temporary Uncertainty

 
  Monday, April 13, 2015  
 
  In 1553, the sickly, 15-year-old King Edward VI died, and uncertainty hung over Great Britain. When the ensuing struggle for the throne was over, another teenager—Lady Jane Grey—had died, and the Tudor monarchy was back on track ... (Read more)    
 
 
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How Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester, wooed Queen Elizabeth I

 
  Monday, April 13, 2015  
 
 
You can't say Robert Dudley didn't try. The enterprising courtier wanted to marry Queen Elizabeth so desperately that he commissioned her portrait repeatedly, then installed splendid apartments and fabulous gardens in his castle just in case she wanted to visit. Here's a look at these rarely seen chambers, which are being restored ... (Read more)
 
 
 
 
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V&A Museum Raises £2.8million to Save Four Bronze Angels Meant for Cardinal Wolsey's Tomb For the Nation

 
  Sunday, April 12, 2015  
 
  Although he had enjoyed privileged status as an advisor to Henry VIII, Cardinal Wolsey ran afoul of the mercurial monarch. When Wolsey died in 1530, four statues intended for his tomb disappeared. Now the Victoria & Albert Museum has a chance to buy the statues back at a princely sum, and the public—inspired in part by Hilary Mantel's Wolf Hall—has chipped in to make it possible ... (Read more)    
 
 
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The Queen’s Pastimes

 
  Sunday, April 12, 2015  
 
 
She played the lute, spoke three languages, and wrote poetry, in addition to being a vigorous rider and a fine shot with the crossbow. Yes, we speak of Queen Elizabeth I, who may have been too busy to get married. Read about her eclectic and sometimes surprising diversions here ... (Read  more)
 
 
 
 
 
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From Henry VIII’s Codpiece to Anne Boleyn’s Corset: Inside Wolf Hall’s Period-Perfect Costumes

 
  Sunday, April 12, 2015  
 
  In the BBC's Wolf Hall, the actors' costumes benefit from designer Joanna Eatwell's insistence on historical accuracy. As she researched the Tudor era, Eatwell discovered that these often-intricate garments held a deep symbolism for the royals ... (Read more)  
 
 
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Elizabeth's Spy Network

 
  Saturday, April 11, 2015  
 
 
Elizabeth I knew that she would need an enormous network of spies to rule the contentious, unstable Britain of her era. Thanks to the zeal and efficiency of such agents as Francis Walsingham, the queen was able to thwart numerous threats to her throne. Here is an overview of the spies' methods, and how they finally snared Mary, Queen of Scots ... (Read more)
 
 
 
 
 
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Oversized Ruffs, Elaborate Lace Embroidery, Pearl Chokers, and Long-Fingered Gloves

 
  Saturday, April 11, 2015  
 
 
Royal exhibition proves Tudor and Stuart fashions were as outlandish as our own.
We'd like to think that garish and patently ridiculous clothes are a Hollywood invention, but these portraits from the Tudor and Stuart eras prove that extravagant get-ups are nothing new ... (Read more)
 
 
 
 
 
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Review: Wolf Hall, the Mini-Series, Unspools Its Power Plays on PBS

 
  Saturday, April 11, 2015  
 
  American television audiences have been anticipating Hilary Mantel's Wolf Hall miniseries for months. Now that it's finally on the air, does the costume drama live up to its hype as a successor to Downton Abbey? ... (Read more)  
 
 
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Wolf Hall Recap: Cromwell, the Nobody Who Gets Things Done

 
  Thursday, April 9, 2015  
 
  This in-depth New York Times article singles out some of the key moments in Wolf Hall. A faithful adaptation of Hilary Mantel's exquisite novels, the BBC miniseries is brought to life by veteran stage performer Mark Rylance in the role of Thomas Cromwell ... (Read more)  
 
 
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Wolf Hall is the Next British Cultural Invasion

 
  Thursday, April 9, 2015  
 
 
If you've just heard of this Wolf Hall business and you're not an expert on Tudor history, here's an article that is essentially a crash course, your very own Wolf Hall 101 ... (Read more)
 
 
 
 
 
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Tudor Tales

 
  Monday, April 6, 2015  
 
  You might not have thought that the jury was still out on the issue of Thomas Cromwell's villainy, but with her popular novels of the Tudor era, Hilary Mantel has begun to overturn the received wisdom on Henry VIII's opportunistic minister ... (Read more)    
 
 
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The Execution of Thomas Cromwell

 
  Monday, April 6, 2015  
 
  Born the son of a smith, Thomas Cromwell eventually became Henry VIII's most trusted advisor. After a career of crushing everyone in his path, Henry's hatchet man experienced an equally stark fall from grace—and became the victim of one of the most botched public executions of all time ... (Read more)    
 
 
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Bizarre Gardening Tips Used By Henry VIII Revealed

 
  Monday, April 6, 2015  
 
  Henry VIII: monarch, lover, musician, and—eccentric gardener? The king's gardening manual advised him that squashes should be nourished with the ashes of human bones, and informed him that cucumbers shake when they hear thunder. Read more about this none-too-scientific treatise here ... (Read more)    
 
 
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Anne Boleyn and the Downfall of Her Family

 
  Monday, April 6, 2015  
 
  Stylish, witty, and seductive, Anne Boleyn made a rapid rise to the position of queen. These same qualities would later lead to accusations of witchcraft, which conveniently allowed for her to be executed. As this article documents, Anne's ambitious family rose—and also fell—with her ... (Read more)    
 
 
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Eight Things You May Not Know About Henry VIII

 
  Sunday, April 5, 2015  
 
  Did Henry VIII really write "Greensleeves"? How did he get the nickname "coppernose?" And what British hero is buried in Henry's tomb? (Read more)  


 
 
 
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Q&A Damian Lewis, king of PBS' 'Wolf Hall,' talks of a TV reign

 
  Sunday, April 5, 2015  
 
 
Henry VIII may have been a larger-than-life historical figure, but in the BBC's Wolf Hall, he's a supporting character. As he explains in this interview, actor Damian Lewis is nonetheless relishing the chance to bring depth to his portrayal of this somewhat misrepresented monarch ... (Read more)
 
 
 
 
 
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Zurawik on PBS's Wolf Hall

 
  Saturday, April 4, 2015  
 
 
The Sun's David Zurawik talks about PBS Masterpiece's Wolf Hall on WYPR FM's Take on Television. (Please note this is an audio clip)  (Read more)
 
 
 
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“We Be Delivered a Prince”: Letter Informing Henry VIII of His Longed-For Son's Birth is Found After 469 Years In A Stately Home

 
  Saturday, April 4, 2015  
 
 
Sometimes you can find the most unlikely things when you finally start dusting your shelves: at a stately manor in Britain, a household steward discovered the letter in which Jane Seymour informs Henry VIII that their son has been born. Take a look at these images of the letter, written just before the queen's unexpected death ... (Read more)
 
 
 
 
 
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Invitation to a Beheading

 
  Saturday, April 4, 2015  
 
  With her novels Wolf Hall and Bring Up the Bodies, Hilary Mantel has earned not only literary accolades but also a high degree of popular success. The New Yorker's James Wood analyzes Mantel's singular gift for making the Britain of four centuries ago feel contemporary and relevant ... (Read more)    
 
 
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Wolf Hall' On Stage And TV Means More Makeovers For Henry VIII's 'Pit Bull'

 
  Thursday, April 2, 2015  
 
 
Although authors are generally sitting on the sidelines as their works are adapted for stage and screen, Hilary Mantel has been very much in the mix for the recent miniseries and theater versions of her Wolf Hall saga. Not only has this ensured the accuracy of these productions, it has also helped Mantel envision the forthcoming conclusion to her trilogy ... (Read more)
 
 
 
 
 
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‘Wolf Hall’ Review: Damian Lewis Rules As Henry VIII In PBS Drama

 
  Wednesday, April 1, 2015  
 
 
Quality television programming is practically Great Britain's chief export, and the British are pretty sure that Americans are going to enjoy Wolf Hall. Even if you're a history aficionado and know how the story ends, the pleasure is in how the story is told ... (Read more)
 
 
 
 
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Top 10 Heads That Rolled During the Reign of Henry VIII

 
  Monday, March 30, 2015  
 
  Given that Henry VIII had 57,000 people beheaded during his reign, it's difficult to choose just ten for special consideration. This countdown nonetheless recaps the downfalls of some of the most compelling, including Anne Boleyn, Thomas More, and Elizabeth Barton, a young nun who prophesied against the king ... (Read more)    
 
 
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Mantel Takes Up Betrayal, Beheadings in 'Bodies'

 
  Monday, March 30, 2015  
 
  Hilary Mantel speaks on her lifelong reverence for history, the significance of the Bible being translated into English, and the various forms of public execution in 16th-century Britain... (Read more)    
 
 
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Wolf Hall, a Six-Part TV Series, Tackles Hilary Mantel’s Books

 
  Monday, March 30, 2015  
 
 
Downton Abbey proved that you can count on the British to produce quality television programs, and the BBC adaptation of Hilary Mantel's Wolf Hall, which makes its PBS debut on April 5th, turns out to be one of the U.K.'s best exports yet ... (Read more)  
 
 
 
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Cromwell Unshadowed, Razor Sharp

 
  Monday, March 30, 2015  
 
  Was Thomas Cromwell a vicious mercenary, or was he perhaps a hero? History is a matter of perspective, as Hilary Mantel's Booker–winning novel Wolf Hall demonstrates ... (Read More)    
 
 
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Richard III Gets a Kingly Burial, on Second Try

 
  Sunday, March 29, 2015  
 
  It has been more than 60 years since England has buried a king, so the recent re-interment of Richard III generated sizeable crowds. The wave of publicity has even generated some positive PR for one of Britain's most hated monarchs. This article details Richard's death, funeral, and rehabilitation. ... (Read more)  
 
 
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King Size! Henry VIII's Armor Reveals He Had a 52in Girth—For Which He Paid a Terrible Price

 
  Sunday, March 29, 2015  
 
  He looks barrel-chested and a bit paunchy in the paintings, but Henry VIII's armor provides the "tale of the tape"—the Tudor monarch had a 52-inch waistline. As this article explains, though, Henry had even more pressing health concerns ... (Read more)  
 
 
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Hilary Mantel: Coalition Government More Brutal to Poor and Immigrants Than Thomas Cromwell Was

 
  Sunday, March 29, 2015  
 
  While it may be tempting to think that the Tudors presided over a backward or even barbaric nation, Wolf Hall author Hilary Mantel suggests that 21st-century Britain is even worse ... (Read more)    
 
 
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Was Hans Holbein's Henry VIII the Best Piece of Propaganda Ever?

 
  Sunday, March 29, 2015  
 
  While Hans Holbein's painting of Henry the VIII makes him look potent, opulent, and proud, the man himself was less impressive. Holbein's makeover effectively turned an over-the-hill, down-on-his-luck monarch into a superhero for the ages ... (Read more)    
 
 
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Revealed: Psychological Profiling Shows Henry VIII's Most Compatible Wife Was Anne Boleyn - Despite Him Cutting Off Her Head

 
  Saturday, March 28, 2015  
 
  In hindsight it seems certain that Henry VIII wasn't particularly compatible with the women he married—after all, he even killed some of them. Here, a modern historian applies matchmaking skills and personality analysis to these relationships, and draws some surprising conclusions about who could have potentially made the king happiest had he only been a bit more patient ... (Read more)  
 
 
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Thomas Cromwell and Henry VIII

 
  Saturday, March 28, 2015  
 
  Thomas Cromwell enjoyed a long stint as Henry VIII's right-hand man. How did he achieve such a formidable position, and what went wrong? (Read more)    
 
 
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From Henry VIII to Nelson: How Historical Figures Could Look Today—In Pictures

 
  Saturday, March 28, 2015  
 
  From a dapper Henry VIII to a "Generation Y" William Shakespeare, some of Great Britain's historic figures get a 21st-century makeover in these photomontages. Many things may have changed for the better over the past 400 years, but clothing isn't one of them! (Read more)    
 
 
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William Tyndale—The Man Who Translated the Bible Into English

 
  Friday, March 27, 2015  
 
  If it weren't for William Tyndale, you might need to know Hebrew and Greek to read the Bible. Here is the dramatic story of the man who risked the wrath of Henry VIII and paid with his life for the crime of translating the Bible into English ... (Read more)    
 
 
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The Tragic Sons of York and Lancaster: Know Your Edwards

 
  Wednesday, March 18, 2015  
 
 
In Tudor-era England, there were a lot of Edwards, most of whom had claims to royal blood and came to a bad end. This short history will help you sort them out. (Read more)
 
 
 
 
 
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Codpieces, Status, and Style in Tudor England

 
  Wednesday, March 18, 2015  
 
 
Shakespeare called it "the deformed thief of fashion," and it's still good for a laugh today. What exactly is a codpiece, and what is the point, anyway? (Read more)
 
 
 
 
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Superheroes and Sci-fi Stars Given 16th-Century Makeover

 
  Wednesday, March 18, 2015  
 
  Prior to the invention of spandex, there probably weren't any superheroes. This hilarious photo gallery envisions such characters as Wolverine, Spider-Man, and Darth Vader suffering the fashion deprivations of the 17th century. If R2-D2 appears hindered by his ruff collar, Robin the Boy Wonder—with his Shakespearian tights—hardly looks different at all! (Read more)
 
 
 
 
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"Wolf Hall": The Changing Faces of Thomas Cromwell

 
  Wednesday, March 18, 2015  
 
  Although we've always considered Thomas Cromwell to be one of history's most Machiavellian villains, recent stage and screen adaptations of Hilary Mantel's Wolf Hall have rehabilitated his image. Which is the real Cromwell? The author of a Cromwell biography weighs in on the issue. (Read more)    
 
 
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Hampton Court Palace Re-creates Edward VI Christening for 500th-Anniversary Celebrations

 
  Tuesday, March 17, 2015  
 
  These photos look like stills from a new miniseries! To celebrate the 500th anniversary of Henry VIII's Hampton Court Palace, more than 90 members of the staff dressed in Tudor costumes to re-create the pomp and circumstance of Edward VI's christening. (Read more)    
 
 
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Graphic: Richard III's Injuries and How He Died

 
  Tuesday, March 17, 2015  
 
 
Analysis of Richard III's skeleton confirms that he was a resilient warrior who died in battle, while disproving the legend that he had a withered arm. So—were the king's remains really endangered by an outhouse? (Read more)
 
 
 
 
 
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Did Richard III Kill the Princes in the Tower?

 
  Monday, March 16, 2015  
 
 
Did Richard III kill his young nephews in order to secure the throne? The king was portrayed as a murderer in Shakespeare's eponymous play, and yet he was exonerated in Josephine Tey's 1951 novel The Daughter of Time. Even in the 16th century, it seems, no one really knew what happened to the boys. Here is a careful consideration of the case. (Read more)
 
 
 
 
 
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Real-life Game of Thrones: Henry VII's Mother Margaret Beaufort Had to Become Shrewd and Calculating to Survive Her Troubled Era

 
  Sunday, March 15, 2015  
 
  A child bride three times over, Margaret Beaufort—the mother of Henry VII—stayed behind the scenes but became the most powerful woman in England. This article recounts the turbulent life of the ambitious Tudor matriarch. (Read more)    
 
 
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Richard III’s DNA Shows Tudors May Have Had No Claim to the Throne

 
  Sunday, March 15, 2015  
 
 
When the earthly remains of Richard III were found under a parking lot a few years ago (ouch!), it was a classic case of "how the mighty have fallen." However, an analysis of the notorious monarch's DNA provided a much bigger scandal—the Tudors didn't have a legitimate claim to the throne of England. (Read more)
 
 
 
 
 
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Is this the Field where Richard III Lost his Kingdom for a Horse? Real Location of Battle of Bosworth Finally Revealed After 500 years

 
  Saturday, March 14, 2015  
 
 
Having spent one million pounds on excavations, British historians found a tiny metal badge shaped like a boar. Its significance? The tiny relic was the emblem of Richard III, confirming that this field was the site of the fateful Battle of Bosworth. (Read more)
 
 
 
 
 
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